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September 23, 2011

8

Communion at Home

by Rev. A. J. Iovine
3 Blind Moose

Image by wallygrom (back home!) via Flickr

During Holy Communion earlier this week, while on a visitation, the person I met with inquired about the wine I had used during our home service. He was a little surprised since it didn’t taste like the port wine we use in church.

It wasn’t a surprise when I told him I had filled up my communion kit with a wine I had at home. Someone I know brought over a particular wine she likes. It was in the refrigerator that morning when I was preparing to go over to church to “fill up” my kit. Instead, I decided to use the wine I had at home.

3 Blind Moose Cabernet Sauvignon.

It is an inexpensive wine – I think it came in around $7 or 8. It is relatively full-bodied and doesn’t leave a heavy aftertaste in your mouth. I read a review that said it had flavors of chocolate, plum, and berries. Me? It just tasted good.

This label is one of favorites, though I am partial to their merlot (I like heavier-tasting wines). When I was drinking wine before my cancer treatment forced me to stop, this was a nice wine to have with dinner. Sometimes I would drink a glass after dinner, but I think 3 Blind Moose fit better as a during dinner drink.

Well, 3 Blind Moose did receive good reviews during a couple of home visits this week. I guess I will continue to use it.

If you would like me to visit you at home (and bring my communion kit with me), then all you have to do is ask.

😉

 

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8 Comments Post a comment
  1. Antoinette McKay
    Sep 23 2011

    if you bring the wine i’ll cook dinner.. lol you just have to give me a list of foods you can eat…

    Reply
    • Rev. Iovine
      Sep 23 2011

      I’ll eat anything your children will eat, minus any meat or meat by-product and sugar. See you tomorrow.

      Reply
  2. Antoinette McKay
    Sep 23 2011

    if you bring the wine i’ll cook dinner.. lol you just have to give me a list of foods you can eat…

    Reply
    • Rev. Iovine
      Sep 23 2011

      I’ll eat anything your children will eat, minus any meat or meat by-product and sugar. See you tomorrow.

      Reply
  3. Matt Jamison
    Sep 23 2011

    I’m sure it was the pietists who came up with the idea that communion wine should taste bad, I suppose to provoke greater penitance or something. Hogwash.

    I believe the True Blood of Jesus Christ should be delivered in, with and under the best wine we can get at a reasonable price. Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine. But you have kept the good wine until now. Why should we have lower standards for the Lord’s Table than we do for our own table?

    And where is it written that we should limit ourselves to a tiny sip? Paul warns against drunkenness at the Eucharist, but that hardly seems a danger among us. As for myself, I like to take a generous mouthful from the chalice.

    Reply
    • Rev. Iovine
      Sep 23 2011

      I always remind people that at the wedding at Cana, Jesus turned water into the BEST wine. He didn’t make Ripple. Our wine should be good during the Lord’s Supper, not too sweet, not too overpowering. We use a nice port here at Saint Matthew’s. One time we tried a white wine that went over like a lead balloon. The white was OK chilled, but nearly everyone liked the red port we were using. Then after the outcry, we switched back.

      And you make a point I’ve always made – when Jesus supped, I don’t think he took a little, the amount that is found in the tiny glasses. In the Supper, we should not be afraid of taking a little more than the tablespoon that fits in those little plastic glass things.

      Reply
  4. Matt Jamison
    Sep 23 2011

    I’m sure it was the pietists who came up with the idea that communion wine should taste bad, I suppose to provoke greater penitance or something. Hogwash.

    I believe the True Blood of Jesus Christ should be delivered in, with and under the best wine we can get at a reasonable price. Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine. But you have kept the good wine until now. Why should we have lower standards for the Lord’s Table than we do for our own table?

    And where is it written that we should limit ourselves to a tiny sip? Paul warns against drunkenness at the Eucharist, but that hardly seems a danger among us. As for myself, I like to take a generous mouthful from the chalice.

    Reply
    • Rev. Iovine
      Sep 23 2011

      I always remind people that at the wedding at Cana, Jesus turned water into the BEST wine. He didn’t make Ripple. Our wine should be good during the Lord’s Supper, not too sweet, not too overpowering. We use a nice port here at Saint Matthew’s. One time we tried a white wine that went over like a lead balloon. The white was OK chilled, but nearly everyone liked the red port we were using. Then after the outcry, we switched back.

      And you make a point I’ve always made – when Jesus supped, I don’t think he took a little, the amount that is found in the tiny glasses. In the Supper, we should not be afraid of taking a little more than the tablespoon that fits in those little plastic glass things.

      Reply

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